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Old 04-03-11, 07:48 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Collegiate baseball leagues (summer leagues)

There are several collegiate baseball "summer" leagues that offer college players a chance get scouted, play tougher competition, refine their skills. Other players might take the opportunity to train. Can we get a thread going to discuss several key questions to educate players and parents ?
  1. Where do you go to learn more?
  2. Should players be playing or training during summer?
  3. Who should contact teams or leagues?
  4. What should the players or parents do ?
  5. Rank the best leagues?
  6. How do players/parents pay for expenses ?
  7. What does the player resume or contract say?
  8. Which league has the best chance to be scouted?
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Old 04-03-11, 11:34 AM   #2 (permalink)
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There are several collegiate baseball "summer" leagues that offer college players a chance get scouted, play tougher competition, refine their skills. Other players might take the opportunity to train. Can we get a thread going to discuss several key questions to educate players and parents ?

1. Where do you go to learn more?
2. Should players be playing or training during summer?
3. Who should contact teams or leagues?
4. What should the players or parents do ?
5. Rank the best leagues?
6. How do players/parents pay for expenses ?
7. What does the player resume or contract say?
8. Which league has the best chance to be scouted?


This is a great thread and should stir a lot of discussion. I'll start by saying that summer college can be a great experience for most college baseball players, but depending on each player, it is not something that is mandatory. For some players I would encourage they don't play in the summer, depending on their health---especially pitchers. Others may want to spend their summer working on their internship, while others may want to spend the summer working out developing an area that needs improvement--like gaining weight and strength.

However, there are only a limited number of rosters spots available through out the country compared to the number of players wanting to participate. The landscape has changed dramatically over the last 15-20 years. Before, there were maybe 3-4 leagues that were considered legitimate talent-wise, so you can imagine those leagues getting the cream of the crop. The majority of college players didn't have an opportunity to play summer ball...and to some degree that still hold true.

The talent level at all divisions of college ball has increased dramatically; so you have players from Mid major D1, D2, D3, NAIA and JUCO seeking opportunities to play.

1. Where do you go to learn more?

Although you will find some excellent coaches, the objective for most players is the opportunity to play against great competition. Plus most college coaches have opened a dialogue with the summer teams asking for them to work on a particular area for improvement, i.e., a pitcher to work on his secondary pitches to develop more confidence in them. Primarily, the objectives of the college coach and the summer teams are not the same. The college coach wants development of his player, which can happen because of playing time, but the summer team's objective is to win games. There are some leagues that won't hesitate to send a player home for non-performance.

EDIT: Oops, I misread the question.

2. Should players be playing or training during summer?

Depends on the player. Does he need rest, exposure or opportunities to play since he had limited action during his school season?

3. Who should contact teams or leagues?

The college coach; 95+% are placed that way. It is rare that a player is placed without a coach's recommendation. To give you an example, the Statesville Owls receive 100's of recommendations from college coaches, yet they only have 30 spots open. It would take a well respected person, outside of a college coach, to refer a player and be accepted. It happens, usually by a scout, but it's rare.

4. What should the players or parents do ?

Can you clarify? On the surface, I would say there is nothing they can do, except, if given the opportunity, can turn it down.

5. Rank the best leagues?

I assume you mean by talent level. Cape Cod is the granddaddy of them all, but after them it bunches up. There's too many to mention that fall into the same category, but it's my opinion, if given an opportunity, it depends on the player and their families. Let me give you an example: The Alaskan League is a great experience on and off the field...and their All Star game is played at midnight with no lights. Why? Because it's daylight that day 24 hours. But if you want to watch your son play that summer...wow, it would be challenging to say the least. Same goes for any leagues out west, even the Northern League that has a team in Canada. However, the importance of a family to watch their son's summer baseball games may not be the priority; I understand that. But quite frankly, players are not offered several opportunities to choose from. They are told by their coach---this is where you will be playing.

6. How do players/parents pay for expenses ?

This is a tricky one. Most believe that summer baseball is FREE!...and some are. However, this is misunderstood. To give you an example, there are 8 leagues supported by MLB; Cape Cod and the SCBL are two of them. Because they are supported by MLB, the players can not play for free. Whether it's categorized as a transportation fee or to pay the host family for room and board or a playing fee, there must be a cost. However, every team in every league have set up a way for any player to pay for their expenses; whether through working camps to having a summer job through a flexible business owner.

7. What does the player resume or contract say?

It's basic: You have committed to that team for the summer (keeps players from jumping ship) and conduct clauses. It spells out what a team is responsible for and what a player is responsible for.

8. Which league has the best chance to be scouted?

No question the Cape Cod league has the greater concentration of scouts. Many of the top round draftees are playing there. But keep in mind there are scouts located all over the country. The regional scouts will cover the leagues in their region. Plus, the leagues sponsored by MLB will certainly be attended by scouts.

But if you ask me which league is the best for your son, I couldn't because it depends on his situation. It's like asking me what's the best school for your son. There's too many factors to consider and I have gone on too long as it is. Besides, this is a good start for discussion.
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Last edited by Braves; 04-03-11 at 12:03 PM.
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Old 04-03-11, 11:44 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Post15fan View Post
There are several collegiate baseball "summer" leagues that offer college players a chance get scouted, play tougher competition, refine their skills. Other players might take the opportunity to train. Can we get a thread going to discuss several key questions to educate players and parents ?
  1. Where do you go to learn more?
  2. Should players be playing or training during summer?
  3. Who should contact teams or leagues?
  4. What should the players or parents do ?
  5. Rank the best leagues?
  6. How do players/parents pay for expenses ?
  7. What does the player resume or contract say?
  8. Which league has the best chance to be scouted?
Here is the little bit that I know. I am sure others can add much more insight.

  1. Where do you go to learn more? Several different sites, mostly from the leagues, www.scbl.org, www.northwoodsleague.com, www.coastalplain.com and www.nacsb.org to name a few
  2. Should players be playing or training during summer? Really depends on their personal situation and the expectation of the players college coach. In many cases they really want them getting the extra reps and in some cases they want them to shut it down and rest their bodies. In the situations I have seen, playing and training are not mutually exclusive. All of these collegiate players have a summer training routine that has been put together by their coaching and training staff. Playing summer ball does not mean they don't follow that training regimen.
  3. Who should contact teams or leagues? Typically the coaching staff at the college look to place the players in the league they feel will best benefit the player. Coaches will speak to the GM of the summer team and provide them with the information needed on the player. In some cases the player reaches out to the teams.
  4. What should the players or parents do ? Play, have fun. Watch, have fun.
  5. Rank the best leagues? Not for me to do. Not enough expertise. They all have different pros and cons.
  6. How do players/parents pay for expenses ? In some leagues there is no fee. In others it is around $500-$600 for the summer, that fee is usually just to cover the cost of transportation around the league which is by charter bus and costs $10,000 or more for the summer. Many players stay with host families in the area they travel to, but the player is still responsible for food, laundry etc.
  7. What does the player resume or contract say? Depends on the league. Contract is a commitment to that team for the summer or in some cases as short as 10 days. Because play starts in early June some of the D1 Players are still playing with their school. Those guys may have contracts with a team and can't join until mid-end of June. that means teams fill those spots temporarily with other players.
  8. Which league has the best chance to be scouted? They all do if the players are there. There is obviously a history predicated on the number of draft picks coming out of certain leagues that have the scouts lean more towards those leagues. There are players in every league that have a shot at the draft.
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Old 04-03-11, 12:19 PM   #4 (permalink)
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The Alaskan League is a great experience on and off the field...and their All Star game is played at midnight with no lights. Why? Because it's daylight that day 24 hours. But if you want to watch your son play that summer...wow, it would be challenging to say the least.
Making that trip this summer braves! Ryan got the unique opportunity to go up there this summer thanks to Coach Rembert!
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Old 04-03-11, 12:31 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Making that trip this summer braves! Ryan got the unique opportunity to go up there this summer thanks to Coach Rembert!
He will have a blast! What team is he playing for?
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Old 04-03-11, 12:50 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Old 04-03-11, 01:16 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Cool.....tell him to bring plenty of mosquito spray. Those suckers are huge! I don't know if Ryan likes fishing, but the King Salmon fishing is the best!
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Old 04-03-11, 08:18 PM   #8 (permalink)
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but don't get caught in the mud on a rising tide

Tide in Anchorage is 34 feet and is semidiurnal (high tide every 12 hours similar to NC coast) big tidal range and strong tidal currents - but area is beautiful
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Old 04-03-11, 08:43 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Tide in Anchorage is 34 feet and is semidiurnal (high tide every 12 hours similar to NC coast) big tidal range and strong tidal currents - but area is beautiful
Oh, and don't let me forget; Ryan could make a few bucks during the summer going out on a boat, "World's Deadliest Catch." It would pay for his school tuition!!!!!!
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Old 04-04-11, 10:00 AM   #10 (permalink)
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This was how one publication ranked the Top 10 leagues:

1. Cape Cod League - Easily the best league in the nation, the Cape Cod League sends handfuls of players to the Major Leagues. With teams in Bourne, Brewster, Chatham, Cotuit, Falmouth,Harwich, Hyannis, Orleans, Wareham and Yarmouth-Dennis, collegiate baseball players flock to Cape Cod to play against the best of the best.
2. Alaska Baseball League - The Alaska League is well known as perhaps the second best collegiate baseball league in the country. The Alaska Baseball League has teams in Fairbanks, Anchorage, Mat-Su and Peninsula.
3. New York Collegiate Summer League - With teams scattered throughout upstate New York, the New York Collegiate Summer League is home to many collegiate players each and every summer. Teams play in Allegany, Amsterdam, Bolvar, Brockport, Elmira, Geneva, Glens Falls, Little Falls, Niagra, Saratoga, Watertown and Webster.
4. California Collegiate League - Home to many talented high school and collegiate players, California is also home to a highly-respected summer collegiate league. Teams are housed in Lake County, Salinas, San Francisco, San Luis and Santa Barbara.
5. New England Collegiate Baseball League - The Cape Cod League takes ownership of Southern Massachusetts while the NECBL owns the rest of New England. With teams spread throughout all six New England states, the NECBL has a host of top players from all divisions.
6. Coastal Plain League - The Coastal Plain League picks from the well-stocked mid-Atlantic and southeast. The Coastal Plain League has teams in Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina.
7. Great Lakes Summer Collegiate League - The Great Lakes League is perhaps the largest summer league in the country for college baseball players. The Great Lakes Summer League has teams in Delaware, Ohio, Michigan and Pennsylvania.
8. Texas Collegiate Baseball League - Much like California, Texas is home to a wealth of baseball talent. Much of that talent plays in the nine-team Texas Collegiate Baseball League.
9. Northwoods League - The Northwoods League has teams in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Iowa and Ontario, Canada.
10. Valley Baseball League - The Valley Baseball League is based in Virginia. The Valley Baseball Collegiate Summer League has nine teams competing, featuring players from Divisions 1, 2 and 3.

You can also find all of the leagues across America at this site:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...seball_leagues
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